blog*spot
get rid of this ad | advertise here

Summary responses for Advanced Exposition mindyuta@earthlink.net

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, October 07, 2003

Testing comments. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Need to do Foucault Panopticism [View/Post Comments]
Summary Response for Bordo
Susan Bordo's essay "Hunger as Ideology" has pictures from 1993. People sure dressed funny in the ads she uses. Are they from the 80's? Geeze.
Summary:
Susan Bordo discusses women and their relationship to food in her essay "Hunger as Ideology". Bordo, a philosopher who discusses cultural issues, describes the relationship women have with food and their body, and how it differs from men.
She uses popular advertisements she says have hidden meanings, both conscious and unconscious efforts of the advertisers.
Bordo points out that in popular culture, men are allowed to be hungry. A big appetite is manly and socially acceptable. Hungry man dinners, ice cream, extra servings, and big homemade cakes are openly enjoyed by men - and there's nothing wrong with that.
Women, on the other hand, need to watch their weight. Advertisements show women eating diet food- fat free Jello and light Wonder bread. Weight Watchers and fit n frosty shakes are among the things "okay" for women to eat.
Bordo also shows how men are not typically the providers of food - women have to prepare meals for men and children, be it grandma, mom, or wife. When a man makes pancakes for his son, it's a special moment worth celebrating with special pancake syrup! When a woman makes pancakes, it's an everyday occurence. Women's desire for food is only allowed when it's implied to be sexually. A woman devours her food compared to her sexual appetite. A woman's sexual appetite is a danger to men. Bordo shows how women are basically oppressed sexually, and emotionally and physically when it comes to food. A thin woman with long, lean legs, tight abs and other toned parts is sexually desirable and socially desirable. Dieting is a given for women. She points out that feeding other people is a nurturing characteristic possessed by women, and she and her mother enjoyed feeding their families. But women take most of the responsibility of the thankless job of nurturing.
Response:
I think this issue is very interesting. I've known at least two friends who I think had eating disorders. One I believe was bulimic during junior high. Another became anorexic/bulimic in high school. Being thin is in.
I think eating is an emotionally charged issue. Women are supposed to be thin, toned, and pretty. Women are supposed to eat salads with fat free dressing and work out all the time.
Thin=sexy. People who are overweight, even just a little, are considered gross, out of control, and ugly.

I wouldn't say that being overweight is desirable - but being overweight isn't exactly a character fault. Being thin isn't necessarily a good thing. I heard somewhere that being 10 lbs underweight was more dangerous than being 25 lbs overweight. I'm not sure where. Doctors don't like to say it's okay to be overweight, so I'm not sure who said that.
Anorexia nervosa is actually a dangerous disease. Supermodels reportedly live on cocaine, cigarettes and champagne. That's fine if you stay up all night and party, and only have to prance up and down the catwalk - but if you're a high school athlete or a college student, you might need to eat some food every once in a while.

My friend who starved herself was a pretty small size- but she still thought she was fat when she looked in the mirror. Not everyone is naturally a size zero. Not everyone has a personal trainer or a gourmet chef like a Hollywood celebrity might to help them lose weight. Some people struggle even getting their family, boyfriend, or friends to support any weight loss.

Oprah had a celebrity trainer, a chef at her home, and experts helping her- but if you'll notice, she was only a size 4 or 6 or 8 or whatever it was, for about 5 seconds.
She could possibly lose a few pounds, but her body just may not be built to be a size zero.

One of my guy friends weighed less than I did when we first met. He added extra food to his diet to gain weight and build muscle. Even though he's taller than I am, it was pretty funny that I weighed more. He always ate more junk food, and food in general, than I did, and had a bigger appetite. Men can eat more calories, in general, they need more calories, in general, and don't really get chastised about their weight. If a boy is overweight, he can typically still play sports, such as football or throw discus in track. I don't hear a lot of negative talk about men being overweight. Even such fatties as "Tony Soprano" from The Sopranos are considered manly and sexy, err, why?
He's bald. And not thin.
The character "George" on Seinfeld was picky about women. Uhm, he's shortfatbaldnugly.
Did anyone see the girl Tony Soprano cheated on his tv wife with? Has anyone seen the sister of Tony Soprano on the show? She's not thin, but her date is a "big" guy. She's not having relations with a hot young thang.

The only show where a woman of "non-normalcy" i.e. more than 100 lbs dates a good looking guy is Days of Our Lives. Nancy is married to hospital chief of staff Craig.

This point is now rambling. I don't see any change in women being objectified. I think fat, ugly men will still want women to be thin and beautiful, despite the cost of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and women dying. How many men die of anorexia? A lot of women do.
Society says being overweight means you're out of control, you can't stop eating, you don't exercise, you don't attempt to lose weight, and you're a slob.
You shouldn't have eaten this, or that.
I don't see a change in society where men are chastised for their eating habits, or their double standard.
People ignore things like metabolism and genetics. If you have a slow metabolism, eating a piece of lettuce can still make you fat. Just because Person X eats lettuce and weighs 120, doesn't mean you will.
You can eat less than skinny person x, and still be fatter.
Burning more calories than you consume is still going to be hard.
Trying to run laps for me with asthma is still going to be hard.
Men being attracted to women who are overweight is not likely to become fashionable in the near future.
Thin women, whether they are muscular, boylike, curvaceous, or seriously underweight, will still be popular and the norm.
If one will notice, whichever Hollywood celeb is popular is considered "sexy". J-Lo's big booty is sexy, but she's thin everywhere else. Same goes for Beyonce's bigger lower body.
Salma Hayek's curvy figure is okay, as long as it's overall-ish thin.
Weight will be equated with worth. The less weight the better. The smarter, more moral, more beautiful, more socially worthwhile.

And people with eating disorders can still base their skewed self-worth on how many laps they can run on one cup of tea with sweetener, because then some guy will like them.

[View/Post Comments]

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

Summary responses on Bordo and Dubois?
They are coming soon, if I don't fall asleep.
Lots of people at work are feeling unwell, and I don't know if anyone else at school is also. My mom was sick this weekend and I was in close quarters with her on a family trip.
Ugh.
Maybe I can go to the health center, not that I actually have TIME to GO. :(
The school computer doesn't have the font my calendar was in, so my calendar is the ugly.

I've pretty much abandoned my other personal blog, so I'm rambling on this one. I'll try not to breathe on anyone in class, I don't know if I have a sinus infection that's contagious or if I have an allergy induced sinus infection that isn't contagious.

So don't let me touch you or breathe on you or sneeze on you.
Working long hours is not good on the body. I haven't seen any fruit for sale in The Market, the UC's food offering place, by the way. Just junk food. :( [View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Did anyone else notice that I put "principal" of the thing instead of "principle" of the thing?

I guess that's my Freudian slip for the day.
Summary responses due on Thursday. I'm working on it! Rough draft due on Thursday. Golly. [View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 25, 2003

RESPONSE

Paulo Freire
"The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are."
Freire, and our conversation in class on Tuesday, brought back a swelling of unpleasant and lost memories for me. Things that were long forgotten - from ten or 15 years ago - came back to the surface.
Kinda like a dead body coming up out of water in movies.
No one wanted to find this memory again.

It's hard for me to write objectively about Freire to do a response at this time, so at the moment I want to go on with some useless thoughts until I can try to ferret out what Freire is saying with banking and teachers and authority.

I have not only my own school experience to deal with, but that of my sister as a young school teacher.
Not only the teachers are the authority figures. Sometimes mindless authorities come in the form of who is in charge of the teacher.
My dad recently met a Fort Worth school administrator who doesn't even have a college degree. Yet he makes $70,000 some odd a year.
Is this person even qualified to be in charge of education? I don't know all the facts. My sister had some people who didn't like her bucking the system when she taught.
I don't want to get her in trouble in any way, so I'm only retelling this as I know it.

When she taught fourth graders, she asked them to do some work writing. For example, she asked them to write a page. Whenever they were done writing, they could move on to the next whatever-they-had-to-do-next.
Her theory was that some people write more slowly than others, and students shouldn't have to wait around until everyone was done to do the next thing. And students shouldn't be cut off when they're writing just because everyone else was finished.

Well, one day some administrator or in-charge-person comes in and is like "Oh no this room is in chaos!! They're not on task!!"
And my sister is like, weeeeeeell, they're writing a page and some are slower than others blah blah blah.
And the administrator or principal or whoever is like "They can't write a page! That's too much! Whine whine whine!"

So of course, my sister was right. The kids COULD write a page and they did well.
I mean, some COLLEGE students have trouble writing a paragraph or a page when they are asked to do it in Intro to English stuff.
Why? Not because they CAN'T. It's because no one ever CHALLENGED them.
People kept telling them it was too hard to do something.
We used to have these little books where you read a story and answer questions, and you did it at your own pace. Whenever you were done, you did the next one until time ran out.
I remember vaguely wanting to be the first one finished, and was confused when people were ahead of me.
But some people just take longer to do things. It's not a competition. If someone takes 2 hours to write a coherent sentence, let them - on their own time. Just because someone can do the same thing faster doesn't mean they're better.

Onto more school experiences. Talking out and disagreeing with the teacher got you in trouble. I learned that in school. Is it really my fault that the teacher is WRONG? There was one poem a teacher and I had an argument about. I didn't think that it was fair for him to say we had a wrong answer when it came to poetry, when the answer, in my mind, was open to interpretation.
Well, he knew what the poem meant. And I didn't.
I ended up in the office in trouble, with the vice principal telling me "it wasn't worth X number of points" and that basically I was in the wrong, and shouldn't argue with the teacher.
What the eff!?! When was it about POINTS?! It was about the principal of the thing.
Do I frickity fracking care about POINTS?!
"sooner or later they may perceive the contradiction in which banking education seeks to maintain them, and then engage themselves in the struggle for their liberation"

Freire says education should make people more passive still "the educated individual is the adapted person, because she or he is better 'fit' for the world. Translated into practice, this concept is well suited to the purposes of the oppressors, whose tranquility rests on how well people fit the world the oppressors have created, and how little they question it."

The banking concept of education "attempts to control thinking and action" and "inhibts their creative power".

"One does not liberate people by alienating them."

**More soon, I don't know how much more time we have to post!**

[View/Post Comments]

Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I don't know of any free comments sites so I might switch to www.blurty.com for my journal since it's free.

So if anyone sees this and wants a site with comments, blurty.com looks basically like livejournal.com but is free, and you can add a friends list.
[View/Post Comments]

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Class update
We had our exam Tuesday and are patiently awaiting scores. Tuesady we will get a writing prompt for our next essay.
So far we have read Hoagland, Berger, Griffin, and Benjamin.
Our next assignment is to read Freire.
We will write our summary response on our blog or on Tuesday in class.

The next assignment is Bordo. Essay # 2 is due two weeks from today.

FYI: Philosophy Club is selling candy for good price$ on the library mall Monday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
[View/Post Comments]

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?